Mysterious success

Understanding Bangladesh’s rapid reduction in undernutrition

As a country’s income level rises, undernutrition rates are expected to fall. However, for years, the mystery of South Asia’s rising income levels existing concurrently with stubbornly high levels of child undernutrition has stumped researchers. Varying theories have flagged lack of proper sanitation, genetics, poor diets and food systems, and ineffective nutrition programming as culprits for the region’s lack of progress in reducing undernutrition. Bangladesh, though, remains a puzzling—yet positive–exception to this “Asian enigma.”

Aug 6, 2014
by IFPRI

The case for improving global nutrition

The following story includes excerpts from two recent pieces drafted by IFPRI researchers as part of the Feeding Development campaign hosted by Devex.

Why nutrition-smart agriculture matters
By Howarth Bouis, Director of HarvestPlus

The focus of agricultural policy should be to increase productivity, provide employment and reduce poverty.

How often have you read or heard statements like this?

What do toilets have to do with nutrition? More than you might think

Increasing the number of toilets and changing behaviour can cut stunting

This blog story by IFPRI senior researcher Lawrence Haddad was originally posted on The Guardian’s Global Development Professionals Network.

Approximately 160 million children under the age of 5 are stunted. This means they are failing to grow well and lack of height can be a marker of a whole range of developmental setbacks including cognitive impairment.

Jul 31, 2014
by IFPRI

Micronutrients and improving nutrition through food systems

In a recent interview with the Global Donor Platform for Rural Development, IFPRI’s Marie Ruel offers highlights from her presentation at last month’s Micronutrient Forum Global Conference in Addis, Ethiopia and speaks candidly with interviewer Pascal Corbé about the current state of research and knowledge around food-based approaches to improving nutrition in the developing wo

Jul 30, 2014

Australia: Championing food policy research

With support from Australia, IFPRI conducts innovative research in areas such as agricultural markets, climate change, and tools and scenarios to improve food security.

Canada commits $20 million for childhood undernutrition prevention project

Research has shown that children who receive adequate nutrition, particularly during their mother’s pregnancy until they are two years old—referred to by experts as the “1,000 days window of opportunity”—are less likely to die or be made ill by diseases such as diarrhea, malaria, pneumonia, measles, and HIV. Yet almost half of all children in the developing world who do not reach their fifth birthday die because they don’t have enough nutritious food and essential vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin A and zinc, to fight off disease.

New research partnership answers White House call for climate data to support food security

In response to a call to action from the White House, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Research Foundation’s Center for Integrated Modeling of Sustainable Agriculture and Nutrition Security (CIMSANS) has announced a new partnership to analyze how food systems can help achieve sustainable nutrition security.

Monsoon Fears Driving Food Inflation in India

The following story was originally published on IFPRI’s Food Security Portal.

Can the US Farm Bill and EU Common Agricultural Policy address 21st century global food security?

With the recent passage of both the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) in the European Union and the Farm Bill in the United States, the EU and US are headed down “divergent paths” in the way their agricultural policies support their own farmers. Nevertheless, both policies feature large public expenditures towards farm subsidies. What type of impact will these policies have on international food security and production and public costs in the US and EU and how will they address the major global food security challenges of the 21st century?