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Can Ethiopia maintain its great progress toward food security?

Nearly 30 years after the 1984 famine that left more than 400,000 people dead, Ethiopia has made significant progress toward food security. Some of these recent successes include a reduction in poverty, an increase in crop yields and availability, and…

Chicago Council Food Security Symposium 2013

Dena Leibman is Head of Outreach at  IFPRI At turns seeming like an inspiring TED talk, policy seminar, industry trade show, research conference, and youth-centric social media event, the  Chicago Council’s Food Security Symposium  succeeded in its goal…

Land degradation: bad for humans, bad for biodiversity

Land degradation—the loss of goods and services derived from our ecosystems, such as soil, vegetation, and other plant and animal life—not only poses a serious threat to long-term food security but puts wildlife diversity in grave danger. Taking the…

Commentary: Walk the Talk

This post  is part of a series produced by  The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, marking the occasion of its annual  Global Food Security Symposium  in Washington, D.C., which will be held on May 21st. For more information on the symposium, click  here.…

The Hidden Costs of US and EU Farm Subsidies

The world food situation continues to be vulnerable. A series of weather-related shocks in 2012—including severe droughts in Central Asia, Eastern Europe, and the United States—contributed to global food prices remaining high for a fifth consecutive…

New Food Security Data Unveiled at Bangladesh Workshop

Despite its transformation from a country of chronic food shortages to one of food self-sufficiency, Bangladesh still faces food-security challenges. This is the conclusion of a massive IFPRI-designed survey on agriculture, consumption, and nutrition…

Research Post

Agricultural Productivity: Good and Bad News

The world’s population is growing, and we only have limited land for farming. Will we run out of food? That question, famously posed by Thomas Malthus in the early 19th century, has been discussed for decades. The short answer is: no, we will not run…

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