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IFPRI Blog

Beyond Coffee and Chocolate

Can Africa’s agricultural sector compete in the global marketplace? Consumable “niche” goods in the form of luxury coffee and teas from Africa are already on the shelves of such major US and UK retailers as Starbucks, Fortnum and Mason, and Costco.…

IFPRI Blog

Not a Free Ride

Collective action in agriculture can take many forms, from contract farming to producer marketing groups. Smallholders often rely on these groups to increase their access to markets and get higher prices for their goods. My  IFPRI discussion paper,…

IFPRI Blog

Farming is the key to solving youth unemployment in Africa

Africa south of the Sahara has the world’s youngest and fastest growing population. With enough support from African leaders, agricultural initiatives will boost employment and the economy. The following post by IFPRI's   Karen Brooks, Director of the   …

IFPRI Blog

Keeping the momentum of West African success

This story originally appeared on the  Food Security Portal blog. Economic growth in the developing world relies heavily on credit, grants, and loans. But increasing poor populations’ access to these financial vehicles brings with it a significant…

IFPRI Blog

Note to WTO: Reform agricultural trade

Co-authored by   David Laborde Debucquet   and Sara Gustafson. The Doha Development Agenda, the World Trade Organization (WTO’s) ambitious trade liberalization program, has been bogged down since its launch in 2001. Although it should not be blamed for…

IFPRI Blog

Ghana’s trouble with chocolate

The production of cocoa—the basis of chocolate—has been a pillar of Ghana’s well-documented economic success. In fact, Ghana is currently the second largest cocoa producer in the world. However, recent challenges are making Ghanaians nervous. The…

IFPRI Blog

Understanding China’s Overseas Economic Zones

Chinese expansion and foreign investment in developing countries has garnered great attention due to China’s growing sphere of influence in the developing world. The lack of transparency and poor data on Chinese overseas investments and China’s…

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