Genetic Resource Policies for the Poor

BioConserv

Source: 2007 Amanda King

BioConserv is a web-based bibliography developed by researchers at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), in collaboration with Bioversity International. It is a unique collection of literature that reflects the emerging interest of applied economists in plant and livestock biodiversity. BioConserv focuses on three major thematic categories addressed in the literature:

  1. Biodiversity of crops and plants
    * In-situ crops (on farm)
    * Ex-situ crops and crop relatives (banks and breeding programs)
    * Medicinal and pharmaceutical plants
  2. Animal genetic resources conservation and sustainable use
  3. Biodiversity measurements

BioConserv is a searchable database (see Browse by Topic or Browse by Year). The collection is updated on a yearly basis and the goal is to gather all economics literature in the area. To attain this goal, BioConserv welcomes Submissions from researchers and interested parties. All relevant papers will be included in the yearly updates.

BioConserv emerged from a 2003 workshop convened by Bioversity International for the System-wide Genetic Resources Programme (SGRP) of the CGIAR on “Managing Agricultural Biodiversity for Sustainable Development,” hosted by the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in Nairobi, Kenya and from a commissioned paper assessing the status of valuation methods for crop and livestock components of agricultural biodiversity with particular emphasis on developing agricultural economies. The paper, which included a thematic bibliography of related literature, is now a chapter in a book. See Smale, M., and A. Drucker, 2007, Agricultural development and the diversity of crop and livestock genetic resources: A review of the economics literature. In Biodiversity economics: Principles, methods and applications, ed. A. Kontoleon, U. Pascual, and T. Swanson. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Technical Notes
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Acknowledgments
BioConserv was produced in close collaboration with the Communications Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute. Special thanks are extended to Mulugeta Bayeh, Melanie Allen, Elinor Dumont, and Gwendolyn Stansbury.