Past Events

  • Date: 
    November 19, 2009
    12:15 pm – 1:45 pm A light lunch will be available at 11:45 am

    Global Hunger Index: Reducing Gender Inequality, Reducing Hunger

    Presenter(s): 
    Klaus von Grebmer, IFPRI; Agnes Quisumbing, IFPRI; Cheryl Morden, IFAD
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    Abstract

  • Date: 
    November 12, 2009
    12.15 pm – 1.45 pm. Light lunch available from 11.45 am

    Millions Fed: Proven Successes in Agricultural Development

    Presenter(s): 
    Rajul Pandya-Lorch, IFPRI; David J. Spielman, IFPRI; Prabhu Pingali, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Raul Montemayor, Federation of Free Farmers Cooperatives Inc.; Chair: Joachim von Braun, IFPRI
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    Abstract

    Learning from successes in agricultural development is now more urgent than ever. Progress in feeding the world’s billions has slowed, while the challenge of feeding its future millions remains enormous and is subject to new uncertainties in the global food and agricultural systems.

  • Date: 
    October 30, 2009
    11:45 am -1:30 pm

    The Other Green Revolution

    Farmer-led Change in the Sahel 1980-2010

    Presenter(s): 
    Mr. Yacouba Sawadogo, Dr. Chris Reij, Dr. Edwige Botoni, and Ms. Sakina Mati Chair: Rajul Pandya-Lorch
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    A successful example of achieving food security while adapting to climate change, catalyzed by farmers and scaled-up by effective aid.

    Abstract

    After the devastating droughts of the 1970s and 1980s, African farmers in the Sahel region mobilized to reclaim their land from the encroaching desert. 30 years later, their work has secured 13 million acres of farmland, fed three million people, recharged village wells, and supplied useful and valuable tree products. Despite growing populations and the threats of climate change, food security has improved in the Sahel region.

  • Date: 
    October 5, 2009
    12:15 – 1:45 P.M. A light lunch will begin at 11:45 a.m.

    Agricultural Adaptation to Climate Change in the Developing World: What will it Cost?

    Presenter(s): 
    Speaker: Gerald Nelson, Senior Research Fellow, IFPRI; Commentator: David Waskow, Director, Climate Change Program, Oxfam America; Chair: Mark Rosegrant, Division Director, IFPRI
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

  • Date: 
    September 29, 2009
    9:00 - 11:00

    Understanding WTO Disciplines on Agricultural Domestic Support

    WTO Public Forum 2009 - Session 12

    Location: 

    Geneva, Switzerland

    Organized by: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

    Abstract

    Formulating new rules for agricultural domestic support to reduce international market distortions remains one of the critical challenges facing the multilateral trade system. High food prices in 2008, although dampened by subsequent global developments, brought renewed attention to domestic support in a different way: how can agriculture be strengthened to meet future food demand and environmental goals?

    The presenters and discussants will focus on four issues:

  • Date: 
    September 15, 2009
    12.15 pm – 1.45 pm; Lunch served from 11.45 am, panel begins at 12.15 pm

    Regional Inequality and Harmonious Development in China

    Presenter(s): 
    Ravi Kanbur, Cornell University; Carl Riskin, Columbia University; Xiaobo Zhang, IFPRI; Shenggen Fan, IFPRI; Chair: Joachim von Braun
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    Abstract

    China’s spectacular achievements in economic growth and poverty reduction have been accompanied by growing inequality, which not only jeopardizes its equitable development goals but also threatens its social compact and thus, the political basis for future economic growth. Chinese policymakers and scholars are questioning this growth pattern and have launched reviews and policy initiatives to address the issues.

  • Date: 
    September 1, 2009
    12:15–1:45p.m. Lunch will be served at 11:45am

    School Feeding Programs: Evidence and Policy Lessons

    Presenter(s): 
    Harold Alderman (World Bank); Don Bundy (World Bank); Dan Gilligan (IFPRI); Chair: Joachim von Braun
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    Abstract

  • Date: 
    August 12, 2009
    12:15–1:45 pm. Lunch will be served at 11:45am.

    Pakistan: A Crisis within the Crises

    Internally Displaced Persons of the Swat and Buner Districts

    Presenter(s): 
    Sohail Jehangir Malik, Nadeem Ul Haque, John Mellor; Chair: Joachim von Braun
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    Abstract

  • Date: 
    July 27, 2009
    12:00-2:00 pm

    Reflections on The Global Food Crisis

    How Did It Happen? How Has It Hurt? And How Can We Prevent The Next One?

    Presenter(s): 
    Derek Headey, IFPRI; Miguel Robles, IFPRI; Nicholas Minot, IFPRI
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    Abstract

  • Date: 
    July 24, 2009
    12:15-1:45 - lunch will be served from 11:45

    Smart Input Subsidies and Sustainable Agricultural Development

    Presenter(s): 
    Nick Minot (IFPRI); Derek Byerlee (World Bank); Balu Bumb (IFDC); Karen Brooks (World Bank); Chair: Joachim von Braun
    Location: 

    International Food Policy Research Institute
    2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
    Fourth Floor Conference Facility

    Abstract

    Agricultural input subsidies were commonly used to alleviate poverty in rural areas in the 1960s and 70s. However, these types of subsidies were abolished in the late 1980s as part of structural-adjustment programs implemented by development agencies. As a result, fertilizer use in Africa plummeted significantly. Today, the low use of fertilizer and other inputs has made that agricultural productivity in Africa not kept pace with population growth and has severely affected food security on the continent.