20th Annual Martin J. Forman Memorial Lecture

Nutrition Repositioned in the Development Agenda? Current Prospects for Scaling-Up Nutrition Outcomes

Date: 
November 4, 2010
Time: 
12:30 pm to 2:00 pm EST (Please join us for lunch beginning at 11:45 am); Live webcast coming up at the scheduled time.

Presenter(s): 
David Nabarro, Special Representative for Food Security & Nutrition, United Nations
Contact/RSVP: 

RSVP to Simone Hill-Lee - s.hill-lee@cgiar.org 202-862-8107

Location: 

International Food Policy Research Institute
2033 K Street, NW, Washington, DC
Fourth Floor Conference Facility

Abstract

Nutrition has recently gained momentum and is increasingly being discussed in high-level global development debates. Dr. Nabarro will share his views on how human nutrition is being prioritized, addressed, resourced and assessed by different groups of stakeholders at global, regional and national levels. He will discuss how different stakeholders are seeking new ways to align their policies for public health, social protection, food system development and humanitarian action with their increasing interest in advancing nutritional outcomes. Dr. Nabarro will also reflect on how nutritional outcomes might evolve in the next five years as a result of different kinds of actions being taken within the international community.

David Nabarro joined the office of the UN Secretary General in September 2005 as Senior UN System Coordinator for Avian and Pandemic Influenza and United Nations Assistant Secretary-General. In January 2009 he was given the additional responsibility of Coordinator of the UN system’s High Level Task Force on the Food Security Crisis. In October 2009, Ban Ki-Moon, UN Secretary General, appointed David Nabarro as his Special Representative for Food Security and Nutrition.

The Annual Lecture commemorates the significant impact on international nutrition by Martin J. Forman, who headed the Office of Nutrition at USAID for more than 20 years. The annual lecturer is invited to present his or her personal, often unconventional, views about large issues dealing with malnutrition.